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Author Topic: Natural Remedies and Cures  (Read 15410 times)

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sistahvee

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Natural Remedies and Cures
« on: March 16, 2007, 02:27:35 AM »

Bless Up Idren

InI came across these Natural remedies and cures while looking for some assistance for a friend.  Please itinue to ADD to the list for the Interested Idren.. Bless


Sage
________________________________________
Latin name: Salvia officinalis
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Excessive perspiration
   Sore throat
In folk medicine, Sage is also taken for bloating, diarrhea, and intestinal inflammation. As a rinse and gargle, it's used for bleeding gums. Applied externally, it treats mild injuries and skin inflammation. In Asia, it's considered a remedy for hemorrhoids, blood in the urine, bloody phlegm, and fluid in the abdomen; and homeopathic practitioners prescribe it for excessive flow of breast milk. However, its effectiveness for all of these problems remains unverified.
   Researchers have also been investigating the value of Sage as a treatment for Type II, non-insulin dependent diabetes. While one study has shown positive results, further confirmation is needed.
What It Is; Why It Works
Valued in the U.S primarily as a seasoning, Sage has a long history of medicinal use abroad. It has been taken for conditions ranging from sexually transmitted disease to insect bites, and is still used in Europe as a gargle for sore throats. It exhibits antibacterial qualities, inhibits viral and fungal growth, reduces perspiration and other secretions, and acts as an astringent, tightening and drying the tissues.
   The plant's medicinal value resides in its crushed, dried leaves and the oil extracted from its flowers, leaves, and stems. Native to the Mediterranean region, Sage is now grown in all of Europe and North America.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Sage.
Special Cautions
Although there is little danger of side effects under ordinary circumstances, extended use of Sage can produce the same symptoms as an overdose. (See "Overdosage," below.)
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Do not take this medication during pregnancy.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:00:33 am
How to Prepare
Powdered Sage can be made into a remedy for bronchitis by mixing 12/3 ounces of the powdered drug with 22/3 ounces of honey.
   Gargles and rinses may be prepared by mixing 2.5 grams of Sage (or 2 to 3 drops of Sage oil) with 3 ounces of water. Alternatively, use 5 grams (1 teaspoonful) of alcoholic extract in 1 glass of water. Undiluted alcoholic extract may also be applied directly to inflamed mucous membranes.
Typical Dosage
The usual daily dosage is:
Dried Sage: 4 to 6 grams (about 1 teaspoonful)
Essential oil of Sage: 2 to 6 drops
Sage tincture (alcoholic extract): 2.5 to 7.5 grams (one-half to 11/2 teaspoonfuls)
Sage liquid extract: 1.5 to 3 grams (about one-quarter to one-half teaspoonful)
Sage honey: 1 teaspoonful in the morning and before bedtime
Powdered Sage: 1 capsule before each meal for excessive perspiration
   Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available. Store away from light and humidity.
Overdosage
The danger of overdose is greater if you are taking an alcoholic extract or the essential oil. To overdose on Sage leaves, you must consume at least 15 grams.
   Symptoms of overdose include a feeling of warmth, rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and convulsions. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:01:10 am
Cabbage
________________________________________
Latin name: Brassica oleracea var. capitata
A Remedy For
Although some consider Cabbage juice a remedy for stomachache, ulcers, poor digestion, bronchitis, cough, and rheumatism, its effectiveness has not been formally recognized. In Asian medicine, Cabbage is also used to treat abdominal disorders, diarrhea, and skin diseases.
What It Is; Why It Works
Cabbage has been valued for its healing properties since the time of Christ. The 1st Century healer Dioscorides recommended it for a variety of ailments, including diarrhea, snake bite, and worms. Today it's recognized for its ability to boost the stomach lining's resistance to gastric acids.
   Originally cultivated in the Mediterranean region, the plant now grows in damp, temperate climates worldwide. Juice of the white Cabbage is the preferred medicinal product.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Cabbage juice.
Special Cautions
At customary dosage levels, Cabbage poses no risks.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions are known.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
Juice can be pressed from fresh chopped Cabbage, or purchased in prepared form.
Typical Dosage
As part of a bland diet: 1 quart daily
For stomachache: 1 teaspoonful before each meal
Overdosage
No information is available

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:02:39 am
Aloe
________________________________________
Latin name: Aloe barbadensis
Other names: Aloe Vera, Barbados Aloe, Cape Aloe, Curacao Aloe, Socotrine Aloe, Zanzibar Aloe
A Remedy For
   Constipation
   Skin inflammation
Two totally different medicines are derived from the Aloe plant. From just below the surface of the leaves comes a juice with potent laxative properties. At the core of each leaf is a colorless gel that soothes the skin.
What It Is; Why It Works
Aloe has played a role in medicine since the 4th century B.C., when ancient Greek doctors obtained it from the island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean. In the 10th century A.D., its remedial powers were recommended to the British king Alfred the Great by the Patriarch of Jerusalem. Muslims who have made the pilgrimage to Mecca are entitled to hang an Aloe plant over their doors as a talisman against evil.
   Aloe is a lily-like, succulent shrub with little if any stem. It produces about 25 fleshy, gray-green leaves in an upright, dense rosette. In Europe, Aloe is used almost exclusively as a digestive aid and laxative. Elsewhere, the gel from the inner leaf is a popular ingredient in many skin preparations and cosmetics.
   The laxative component of the plant works by preventing the absorption of water from the bowel, thus increasing the volume of its contents and hastening their passage. This component of Aloe also kills bacteria and is active against a variety of viruses, including herpes, chickenpox, and flu.
   The gel from the inner leaf, usually called Aloe Vera, has anti-inflammatory and pain-killing properties. However, tests of its medicinal value has been quite contradictory. Some researchers have found that it speeds wound healing, others have reported that it actually interferes with healing. It seems to protect skin from the effects of frostbite, and has been proven effective against common psoriasis.
Avoid If...
Because of its effect on the bowels, you should avoid taking Aloe internally if you have an intestinal obstruction, an acute inflammatory intestinal disorder such as Crohn's Disease, ulcerative colitis, appendicitis, or any abdominal pain of unknown origin. Not for children under 12.
Special Cautions
When used as a laxative, Aloe can cause abdominal pain or discomfort. If it does, reduce the dosage. Swelling, kidney disorders, heart irregularities, and bone loss are potential--but rare--side effects.
   Do not take Aloe for more than 1 to 2 weeks without consulting a doctor. Long-term use can lead to potassium deficiency and has been linked to an increased risk of colon cancer.
Possible Drug Interactions
Avoid combining Aloe with other medications that flush water and potassium from the body, including diuretics such as Diuril and Lasix, steroid drugs such as prednisone, and licorice root.
   Potassium plays an important role in regulating the heart, so depleting it through long-term use of laxatives can affect the action of certain heart medications. The effects of drugs such as digitalis and digoxin (Lanoxin) may be increased. Drugs taken to steady the heartbeat could also be affected.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Do not take Aloe during pregnancy. Use caution when breastfeeding.
How to Prepare
The laxative form of Aloe is supplied in powder, liquid, and capsule forms.
Typical Dosage
When taken orally for constipation, the usual daily dosage is 20 to 30 milligrams. Use the smallest dose necessary to produce a soft stool. Allow 9 hours for the medicine to take effect.
Store away from light and moisture.
Overdosage

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:03:32 am
Asparagus Root
________________________________________
Latin name: Asparagus officinalis
Other name: Sparrow grass
A Remedy For
   Kidney and bladder stones
   Urinary tract infections
Only the below-ground stem and the roots of the plant have documented medicinal value, although the above-ground parts have also been used. In Asian medicine, Asparagus Root is given for cough, diarrhea, and nervous problems, but its effectiveness for these conditions remains unverified.
What It Is; Why It Works
Used in its wild form in Ancient Greece and Rome, Asparagus is a natural diuretic that flushes out the kidneys and helps prevent the formation of kidney stones. A perennial with a woody root stock, Asparagus grows from 1 to 5 feet high. The female Asparagus plant is slimmer than the male, which is shorter and stockier. Although the plant's berries are thought to be poisonous, there is no proof of this.
Avoid If...
Do not take Asparagus Root if you have kidney disease.
Special Cautions
If you have a weak heart or poor kidneys, do not attempt to flush out the urinary system with Asparagus Root or other diuretics. When using Asparagus, be sure to drink plenty of liquids.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
Chopped Asparagus Root is used for teas.
Typical Dosage
Asparagus is taken orally. The usual daily dosage is 11/2 ounces to 22/3 ounces of the chopped stem and roots.
   Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:04:26 am
Beans
________________________________________
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
A Remedy For
   Kidney and bladder stones
   Urinary tract infections
Homeopathic practitioners recommend this herb for diabetes and heart conditions. In folk medicine, it is used to increase urine flow and relieve diabetes.
What It Is; Why It Works
The Bean plant grows 1 to 2 feet high and when in bloom boasts white, pink, and lilac flowers. Only the crushed pods are used for medicinal purposes. They have a mild diuretic action, helping to flush excess water from the system.
   The plant is believed to have originated in India, but now grows worldwide. Probably because of the pods' resemblance to the male reproductive organ, Beans were worshipped in ancient Egypt, and it was verboten to eat them. Today, Jewish High Priests cannot eat Beans on the Day of Atonement. In Italy, they are distributed to poor people on the anniversary of a death.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of this herb.
Special Cautions
Large quantities of raw pods or beans can cause severe digestive distress. However, customary dosages of tea made from the pods produce no side effects.
Possible Drug Interactions
There are no known drug interactions.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No information is available.
How to Prepare
To make a tea, pour boiling water over 2.5 grams (About 11/2 teaspoonfuls) of crushed pods, steep for 10 to 15 minutes, and strain.
Typical Dosage
The usual daily dosage is 5 to 15 grams (about 3 to 10 teaspoonfuls).
   Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
A massive overdose of raw beans can cause vomiting,
Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:05:09 am
Barley
________________________________________
Latin name: Hordeum distychum
Other names: Pearl Barley, Pot Barley, Scotch Barley
A Remedy For
   Indigestion
Barley is also used as a remedy for diarrhea and inflammatory conditions of the stomach and bowels.
What It Is; Why It Works
Yes, common Barley does have healing properties, conferring a soothing effect on the digestive tract. The grain itself, with the husk removed, is the medicinal element. It can be made into a soothing and nutritional drink, and has been used to dilute cow's milk for very young children. Barley is also the source of malt extract and malt vinegar.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Barley.
Special Cautions
There are no known risks.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
For medicinal purposes, Barley is usually taken as a malt extract.
Typical Dosage
There are no general recommendations on record. Follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:05:48 am
Latin name: Ricinus communis
Other names: Castor Bean, Mexico Seed, Oil Plant, Palma Christi
A Remedy For
   Constipation
Taken internally, Castor Oil is also used as a treatment for intestinal inflammation and worms. Powder from the Castor bean and leaves is applied externally to relieve skin inflammation, boils, abscesses, earache (otitis media), and migraine, although there's no proof of its effectiveness for these ailments. In Asian medicine, Castor Oil is used as a remedy for joint pain, dry stool, indigestion, facial paralysis, boils, and ulcers. Homeopathic practitioners prescribe it for digestive ailments.
What It Is; Why It Works
Castor Oil has been used as a laxative since antiquity. It's mentioned by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus, and beans from the Castor plant have been found in Egyptian tombs. The plant can be found from temperate latitudes to the tropics.
   Castor Oil's laxative effect stems from its ability to prevent absorption of liquids from the intestinal tract. While the oil is relatively safe, the beans are extremely poisonous (as few as 12 can be fatal), and they should never be taken internally. They can cause severe fluid loss and lethal circulatory collapse.
Avoid If...
Don't take Castor Oil if you have nausea, vomiting, an intestinal blockage, appendicitis, severe inflammatory intestinal disease, or any abdominal pain of unknown origin. Not recommended for pregnant and nursing women and children under 12.
Special Cautions
Habitual use of Castor Oil discourages normal activity in the intestinal tract, leading to laxative dependence. Prolonged use can also result in an unhealthy depletion of minerals, particularly potassium. In rare cases, an allergic skin rash may develop.
Possible Drug Interactions
Potassium depletion due to habitual use can increase the body's sensitivity to certain heart medications, such as digitalis and digoxin (Lanoxin).
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Do not use during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.
How to Prepare
Castor Oil is supplied commercially.
Typical Dosage
For acute constipation or worms, the dose is at least 10 grams (2 teaspoonfuls). Follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
An overdose will irritate the stomach, leading to queasiness, vomiting, cramps, and severe diarrhea. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:06:59 am
Cayenne
________________________________________
Latin name: Capsicum annuum
Other names: Chili Pepper, Paprika, Red Pepper
A Remedy For
   Muscular tension
   Rheumatism
Applied in a cream, Cayenne also relieves painful muscle spasms in the shoulder, arm, and spine areas, bursitis, the pain of shingles, phantom pain following amputation, and the pain of diabetic neuropathy. It is often used to ease the pain of arthritis.
   Taken orally, Cayenne has also been used as a remedy for stomachaches, cramps, gas, indigestion, loss of appetite, diarrhea, alcoholism, seasickness, malarial fever, yellow fever, and other fevers, and has been taken as a preventive measure against hardening of the arteries, stroke, and heart disease. Its effectiveness for these purposes has not, however, been scientifically verified.
What It Is; Why It Works
Capsaicin, the active ingredient in Cayenne, depletes the chemical messengers that send signals through the pain-sensing peripheral nerves, thus deadening the sensation of pain even when its cause remains present. The effect builds up gradually, so capsaicin-containing creams must be applied regularly in order to provide relief.
   The pain-killing action of capsaicin cream has been verified in a rigorous trial on patients with chronic severe diabetic neuropathy. Researchers have also found that, taken internally, Cayenne protects the stomach lining from the damaging effects of aspirin.
   A member of the same family that produces bell peppers, jalapenos, and paprika, Cayenne originated in Mexico and Central America, but today is cultivated in all warmer regions of the globe. In general, the hotter the pepper, the greater its medicinal value.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions currently preclude the use of Cayenne, but you should avoid applying capsaicin creams to areas of broken or irritated skin.
Special Cautions
In sensitive individuals, Cayenne may cause severe allergic reactions and inflammation of the eyes, nose, and gums. On the skin, full-strength capsaicin can cause inflammation, blisters, and ulcers, and even mild medicinal preparations should be handled with care. To avoid severe burning, keep all capsaicin-containing creams away from the eyes and mucous membranes, and wash your hands thoroughly after each application. Do not cover the cream with a tight bandage, or use it with a heating pad. Do not apply it immediately after taking a shower or bath.
   When taken internally, Cayenne can cause diarrhea and cramps. High doses taken over extended periods of time may cause chronic stomach problems, kidney damage, liver damage, or nerve problems.
Possible Drug Interactions
Taken internally, capsaicin may interfere with aspirin and similar analgesics.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Studies of Cayenne's effects during pregnancy have produced contradictory results. Until its safety is conclusively demonstrated, the wisest course while pregnant is to avoid its use.
How To Prepare
Cayenne is available in capsule and liquid form for internal use. For external use, there are a variety of creams and gels containing 0.025% to 0.075% capsaicin.
Typical Dosage
Apply capsaicin cream no more than 3 or 4 times daily. Allow 4 weeks for maximum benefit.
   Since the potency of commercial preparations may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
An overdose of Cayenne can precipitate a drastic, life-threatening decline in body temperature. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:08:01 am
A Remedy For
   Urinary tract infections
Cranberry has long been recommended as a preventive measure against repeated urinary tract infections. It is also taken to prevent kidney stones and "bladder gravel."
What It Is; Why It Works
Cranberry prevents E. coli--the most common cause of urinary tract infections--from adhering to the wall of the bladder, making it difficult for infection to take hold. It will not, however, kill the bacteria once they're established.
   Native to North America, the plant is cultivated in Cranberry bogs throughout New England and elsewhere. The medicinal part is the ripe fruit.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Cranberry.
Special Cautions
Remember that Cranberry will not cure an active urinary tract infection. For this, you need a course of antibiotics.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Cranberry is considered safe for use during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.
How To Prepare
You can take concentrated tablets and capsules, or Cranberry juice. If taking the juice, choose pure, high-quality products, not Cranberry cocktail.
Typical Dosage
Capsule or tablet: 1 pill 2 to 4 times per day
Juice: 16 ounces (2 cups) per day
   Since potency of tablets and capsules may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
No information is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:08:49 am
Cumin
________________________________________
Latin name: Cumina cyminum
A Remedy For
   Indigestion
Although its use is not officially recognized, Cumin is considered an effective remedy for indigestion. It is also taken to relieve gas, diarrhea, and cramps; and in Asian medicine, it is used to induce milk production in breastfeeding mothers, relieve inflammation, and cure worm infestations. Its effectiveness for these other uses has not, however, been scientifically verified.
What It Is; Why It Works
A distinctive spice used in southwestern and Indian cuisine, Cumin is mentioned in the Bible and was used medicinally in Roman times, when ground Cumin was eaten with bread or wine. Today, Cumin is cultivated throughout the Mediterranean region and in Iran, Pakistan, India, China, the United States, and South America.
   The seeds and their oil are both used medicinally. Laboratory studies have shown that powdered cumin has anti-infective effects and may inhibit blood clots.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Cumin.
Special Cautions
No special precautions are needed.
Possible Drug Interactions
Animal studies suggest that Cumin may prolong the effect of barbiturates such as phenobarbital.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Cumin is used in some cultures to induce abortion, so caution is advisable during pregnancy.
How to Prepare
Cumin can be taken internally or used externally. It can be used in the ground form or as a pressed oil.
Typical Dosage
Strengths of medicinal preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
No information is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:09:24 am
Dandelion
________________________________________
Latin name: Taraxacum officinale
Other names: Blowball, Cankerwort, Lion's Tooth, Priest's Crown, Swine's Snout, Wild Endive
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Indigestion
   Kidney and bladder stones
   Liver and gallbladder problems
   Urinary tract infections
In folk medicine, Dandelion is also used as a remedy for hemorrhoids, gout, rheumatism, eczema, other skin conditions, and diabetes. Its effectiveness for these problems has not, however, been verified.
   In Asian medicine--again without verification--Dandelion is used to treat chronic ulcers, stiff joints, and tuberculosis. It is also used to induce milk production in nursing mothers and to soothe inflamed breast tissue.
What It Is; Why It Works
The stubborn and ubiquitous Dandelion has been used for medicinal purposes since the 10th century. It shows proven value as a diuretic, flushing excess water from the body. It also promotes the flow of bile and stimulates the appetite. Dandelion juice once enjoyed considerable popularity as a diuretic, laxative, and remedy for rheumatism.
   Dandelion takes its name from the French "dent de lion," or "lion's tooth"--a reference to the toothed edges of its leaves. The entire plant is considered medicinal.
Avoid If...
Do not use Dandelion if you have an obstruction of the bowels or the bile duct. Check with your doctor before using Dandelion if you have any type of gallbladder problem.
Special Cautions
Chances of any sort of allergic reaction are remote, but Dandelion has been known to cause heartburn.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No information is available.
How to Prepare
To make a tea, pour 1 cup of rapidly boiling water over 1 tablespoonful of finely cut Dandelion, steep for 15 minutes, and strain.
Typical Dosage
Tincture: 10 to 15 drops 3 times daily
Tea: 1 freshly made cup 2 times daily, morning and evening
   Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
   Store away from light and moisture.
Overdosage
No information is available

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:10:29 am
Dill
________________________________________
Latin name: Anethum graveolens
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Bronchitis
   Colds
   Cough
   Fever
   Liver and gallbladder problems
   Sore throat
   Tendency to infection
Both Dill seed and Dill leaf have been used medicinally, but only Dill seed has been proven effective. It provides relief for all the conditions listed above, and is also used for upset stomach. In Asian medicine, it is used as a remedy for chest congestion, intestinal gas, bad breath, and skin diseases.
   Dill leaf has been used for stomach and intestinal problems, kidney and urinary tract conditions, spasms, and sleep disorders, but its effectiveness for these conditions remains unproven.
What It Is; Why It Works
Dill is a familiar kitchen spice, best known as a flavoring for pickled cucumbers. The tiny seeds are extremely light: 1,000 of them weigh only 1 gram. They act medicinally by relieving spasms and blocking the growth of bacteria. The more potent oil of Dill is obtained from the seeds.
   Dill's natural habitat includes the Mediterranean region, and the plant was well known in biblical times. In Matthew XXIII:23 it is mentioned by its original Greek name, Anethon. During the first century, Greek herbalist Dioscorides also used the Greek name. But by the 17th century, scholars were already calling it by the modern name "Dill."
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Dill.
Special Cautions
At usual dosage levels, Dill poses no health hazards. Contact with juice from the fresh plant, however, can make your skin react badly to sunlight.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
Whole Dill seed can be made into a tea.
Typical Dosage
Dill is taken orally. The usual daily dosage is:
Dill seed: 3 grams
Oil of Dill: 0.1 to 0.3 grams (2 to 6 drops)
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:11:07 am
English Plantain
________________________________________
Latin name: Plantago lanceolata
Other names: Buckhorn, Chimney-sweeps, Headsman, Ribwort, Ripplegrass, Soldier's Herb
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Colds
   Cough
   Fever
   Skin inflammation
   Sore throat
   Tendency to infection
   Wounds and burns
English Plantain is used primarily for inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. In folk medicine, it has been used to stop bleeding.
What It Is; Why It Works
With a brush-like flower and pronounced ribs on the leaves, this 20-inch plant is widespread in the cool temperate regions of the world. The liquid extract and the pressed juice of the fresh plant exhibit proven antibacterial properties, as well as a tightening, astringent action.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of English Plantain.
Special Cautions
At standard dosages, use of this herb poses no problems.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
To make a tea, pour boiling water over 2 to 4 grams (about one-half teaspoonful) of chopped herb, or put the herb in cold water and bring to a boil. Steep for 10 minutes, then strain.
   English Plantain is also used in liquid extract, lozenge, and syrup form, and in many cough medications.
Typical Dosage
English Plantain can be taken orally or applied externally. The usual oral dosage is 3 to 6 grams (one-half to 1 heaping teaspoonful) daily.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:11:45 am
Elder
________________________________________
Latin name: Sambucus nigra
Other names: Black Elder, Boor Tree, Bountry, Ellanwood, Ellhorn, European Alder
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Cough
Elder is taken for symptomatic relief in all sorts of upper respiratory ailments. As an herbal compress, it is also used for swelling and inflammation; but its effectiveness for these problems remains unproven.
What It Is; Why It Works
The source of Elderberry wine (which is NOT medicinal), Elder is found throughout most of Europe. The plant is a tree or bush that reaches a height of over 20 feet, with strongly perfumed, yellowish-white flowers and black-violet berries that yield blood red juice. The bark, leaves, berries, and roots are all considered medicinal when harvested at the proper time.
   Elder soothes coughs and inflammation by increasing bronchial secretions. It also noticeably increases sweating.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Elder.
Special Cautions
At customary dosage levels, Elder poses no risks.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
To make Elder tea, simmer 3 to 4 grams (about 2 teaspoonfuls) of Elder flowers in two-thirds of a cup of boiling water for 5 minutes, then strain.
Typical Dosage
Drink 1 or 2 cups of the tea, as hot as you can stand, several times a day--especially in the afternoon and evening. Your total daily dose should fall in the range of 10 to 15 grams.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:12:32 am
Fennel
________________________________________
Latin name: Foeniculum vulgare
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Cough
   Indigestion
Fennel syrup and Fennel honey soothe inflammations of the upper respiratory tract. Fennel is also a remedy for digestive problems, such as mild spasms in the stomach or intestines, a feeling of fullness, and intestinal gas.
What It Is; Why It Works
Fennel stimulates movement of food through the stomach and intestines; in higher doses it puts a stop to intestinal spasms. Lab experiments have revealed substances in Fennel that show an ability to dry up respiratory phlegm and destroy germs. The part of the fennel plant used medicinally is the dried seed and its oil.
   Fennel first grew in the Mediterranean region, then spread to England, Germany, and Argentina. Today, it also grows in Iran, Iraq, and China. The plant's scientific name is from the Latin "foenum," which means hay. This name evolved into "Fanculum" during the Middle Ages, later becoming "Fenkel," and finally "Fennel."
Avoid If...
Allergic reactions to Fennel are very rare. If you have an allergy to celery, however, Fennel might also cause a reaction.
Special Cautions
When taken at usual dosage levels, Fennel poses no risks. However, preparations other than Fennel tea or the herb itself should not be given to small children. Take Fennel oil preparations for no more than 2 weeks.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
If you are pregnant, avoid any Fennel preparation other than the herb itself or Fennel tea.
How To Prepare
Crushed or ground Fennel seed can be made into a tea.
Typical Dosage
Fennel is taken orally. The usual daily dosage is:
Fennel oil: 0.1 to 0.6 milliliters (about 2 to 12 drops)
Fennel seed: 5 to 7 grams (about 1 to 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls)
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:13:37 am
Fig
________________________________________
Latin name: Ficus carica
A Remedy For
Figs are taken as a remedy for constipation, although a laxative effect has never been scientifically documented. In Asian medicine, Figs are recommended for infectious diarrhea and intestinal inflammation.
What It Is; Why It Works
The Fig is native to Asia Minor, Syria, and Iran. It is mentioned frequently in the Bible, and was held sacred by the Romans, who believed that Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were suckled beneath the limbs of a Fig tree. By the time of the Roman historian Pliny, the Fig was considered so important that its export was outlawed. Today, it is grown in subtropical regions around the world.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of the Fig.
Special Cautions
No side effects have been recorded.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
Dried Figs may be used.
Typical Dosage
There are no recommendations on record.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:14:14 am
Fig
________________________________________
Latin name: Ficus carica
A Remedy For
Figs are taken as a remedy for constipation, although a laxative effect has never been scientifically documented. In Asian medicine, Figs are recommended for infectious diarrhea and intestinal inflammation.
What It Is; Why It Works
The Fig is native to Asia Minor, Syria, and Iran. It is mentioned frequently in the Bible, and was held sacred by the Romans, who believed that Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were suckled beneath the limbs of a Fig tree. By the time of the Roman historian Pliny, the Fig was considered so important that its export was outlawed. Today, it is grown in subtropical regions around the world.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of the Fig.
Special Cautions
No side effects have been recorded.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
Dried Figs may be used.
Typical Dosage
There are no recommendations on record.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:14:46 am
Flaxseed
________________________________________
Latin name: Linum usitatissimum
Other name: Linseed
A Remedy For
   Constipation
   Skin Inflammation
Flaxseed is also used to soothe an irritated stomach, intestines, or bladder. It is said to lower cholesterol; and Flaxseed oil is believed by some to have beneficial effects on the heart.
   Asian medicine enlists it as a remedy for chest congestion, diarrhea, gonorrhea, and irritation of the urinary canal. However, its effectiveness for these purposes remains unverified.
What It Is; Why It Works
Flaxseed stimulates bowel movements by acting as a swelling agent within the intestines. Animal experiments suggest an ability to reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Some researchers think that lignans in the seeds may have cancer-fighting effects.
   Derived from the same plant that supplies linen, Flaxseed has been with us for thousands of years. Archeologists found Flaxseed and linen cloth in the pyramids. Homer's Odyssey mentions flax as the material for sails, and the Bible refers to it frequently.
   Flaxseed is cultivated in temperate and tropical regions around the world. Its sky blue flowers open only in the morning. Only the dried seeds and their oil are routinely used for medicinal purposes.
Avoid If...
Do not use Flaxseed if you have a bowel obstruction or any narrowing of the digestive tract; Flaxseed's tendency to swell could lead to a blockage. Also avoid Flaxseed if you have a severe inflammation of the gullet, stomach entrance, or intestine.
Special Cautions
When using Flaxseed as a laxative, be sure to take it with plenty of water to reduce the risk of an intestinal blockage. When taking it for inflammatory bowel conditions, allow it to swell in water before use.
Possible Drug Interactions
Flaxseed may delay absorption of other drugs taken at the same time.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
To treat skin inflammations, apply Flaxseed externally. Use 30 to 50 grams (about 2 to 3 tablespoonfuls) of Flaxseed meal in a hot, moist compress. Flaxseed oil, mixed with limewater, relieves burns and scalds.
   Flaxseed can also be used to remove a foreign body from the eye. Moisten a single Flaxseed and place it under the eyelid. The foreign object should stick to the mucous secretion of the seed.
   When using Flaxseed for inflammatory stomach and bowel conditions, soak 5 to 10 grams of the whole seeds in cold water for 20 to 30 minutes, then pour off the liquid.
Typical Dosage
For constipation: Take 1 tablespoonful of whole or cracked seeds with 150 milliliters (one-half cup) of water 2 to 3 times daily.
To lower cholesterol: Take 35 to 50 grams of crushed seeds daily.
To promote coronary health: Take 1 to 2 tablespoonfuls of Flaxseed oil daily.
For bowel inflammation: Take 2 to 4 tablespoonfuls of milled Flaxseed soaked in water.
Overdosage
Large quantities of Flaxseed taken with too little fluid can cause a bowel obstruction.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:15:30 am
Garlic
________________________________________
Latin name: Allium sativum
A Remedy For
   Hardening of the arteries
   High blood pressure
   High cholesterol
Garlic has also been taken internally for coughs, colds, bronchitis, digestive ailments, menstrual pain, and diabetes, though its effectiveness for these problems is unproven. Also unverified is its ability to relieve corns, calluses, ear infections, muscle and nerve pain, and sciatica through external application.
What It Is; Why It Works
Clinical trials of Garlic tablets and oil have yielded confusing and conflicting results. Some researchers have found that doses of 900 milligrams a day significantly lower both total cholesterol and "bad" LDL cholesterol. Others have tested the same dosage and observed no improvement. Nevertheless, a majority of experts now agree that the herb does have a cholesterol-lowering effect which, in turn, fights hardening of the arteries. It also acts as a mild blood-thinner, an antioxidant, and an immune-system booster.
   Much of the confusion over Garlic may arise from a lack of standardization in commercial products. Allicin, the active ingredient in Garlic, is strongest in the fresh herb (and is inactivated by cooking). In over-the-counter preparations, its strength varies widely.
Avoid if...
Because of its blood-thinning, anti-clotting properties, it's best to avoid taking large amounts of Garlic before an operation.
Special Cautions
Even at standard doses, Garlic can cause digestive problems in some people. Symptoms include abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and a feeling of fullness. Other possible reactions include headache, muscle pain, fatigue, vertigo, watery eyes, and asthma. Large quantities can cause bad breath and body odor.
Possible Drug Interactions
Combining Garlic with blood-thinners such as Coumadin can increase the risk of bleeding. Taking it with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Indocin can pose the same danger.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Garlic is not recommended if you're breastfeeding.
How To Prepare
Garlic oil: Crush the cloves using a garlic press; stir into equal amounts of fatty oil and let stand for 48 hours. When finished, filter the oil preparation.
Solid Garlic extract: Chop bulbs and soak in alcohol for a while. Pour off liquid; allow alcohol to evaporate.
Aqueous (water) extract: Crush fresh bulbs in cold water using equal amounts of water and Garlic.
Fermented Garlic: Soak minced Garlic for a long period in a water-alcohol mixture.
Garlic extracts are available commercially in tablet, capsule, and powder forms.
Typical Dosage
The usual daily oral dosage is 4 grams (approximately three-quarters teaspoonful) of fresh Garlic or 8 milligrams of Garlic oil.
   For high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, typical doses of commercial preparations range from 600 to 900 milligrams daily. For high blood pressure, take 200 to 300 milligrams 3 times daily. Because potency varies, follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:16:20 am
Ginseng
________________________________________
Latin name: Panax ginseng
A Remedy For
   Fatigue
This famously energizing herb has been found to improve abstract thinking, speed up reaction time, and boost resistance to viral infections. In Chinese medicine, it is also considered a remedy for digestive problems, vomiting, and bloody sputum, although its effectiveness for these purposes remains unverified.
What It Is; Why It Works
Valued as a medicine in China for over 2,000 years, Ginseng was once held in such high esteem that only the emperor was allowed to collect it. It has traditionally been used by elderly Asians to boost physical and mental vitality. Only the root is medicinal.
   The active ingredients in Ginseng are a set of compounds called ginsenosides. These complex chemicals have a variety of effects, ranging from stimulation of the nervous system to reduction of blood sugar levels. The herb also has an antioxidant effect, stimulates the immune system, thins the blood, and reduces "bad" cholesterol levels.
   Panax ginseng is native to China, but is also cultivated in Korea, Japan, and Russia. An almost identical plant, Panax quinquefolius, grows in the United States and was, in fact, exported to China during the 18th Century.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Ginseng, but people with heart and circulation problems should use it with care. Caution is also advisable if you have hypertension, since overuse of the herb can cause an increase in blood pressure. Because of its effects on blood sugar, people with diabetes should be cautious as well.
Special Cautions
At customary dosage levels, side effects are unlikely. Breast pain and postmenopausal vaginal bleeding have occasionally been reported. Other possible side effects include insomnia, headaches, nervousness, nosebleeds, and vomiting. Overuse of the herb, especially in combination with caffeine, can result in Ginseng abuse syndrome (see "Overdosage").
Possible Drug Interactions
Because of its blood-thinning effects, Ginseng should not be combined with anticoagulant drugs such as Coumadin, or with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that tend to cause bleeding, including Aleve, Anaprox, Indocin, Naprosyn, and Orudis. Be cautious, too, when taking the herb with insulin or other diabetes drugs. The combination could lead to an excessive drop in blood sugar levels.
   There have been reports of headache, tremors, and mania when Ginseng is taken with the antidepressant drug Nardil. Many Ginseng products may also interfere with certain water pills. Check with your doctor before combining Ginseng with this type of drug
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Ginseng is capable of affecting a developing baby. It's best to avoid it during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
How to Prepare
To make a tea, pour boiling water over 3 grams of chopped root, steep for 5 to 10 minutes, and strain.
Typical Dosage
Root: 1 to 2 grams daily
Tea: Take 3 to 4 times daily for 3 to 4 weeks.
   Standardized extracts are often taken at a rate of 100 to 200 milligrams daily. Strengths of commercial preparations may vary, so follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
Massive overdosage can lead to Ginseng abuse syndrome. Symptoms include sleeplessness, tight muscles, water retention, and high blood pressure. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:17:04 am
Hemp Nettle
________________________________________
Latin name: Galeopsis segetum
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Cough
In folk medicine, Hemp Nettle has also been used to treat lung conditions and flush excess fluid from the body, but its effectiveness for such problems has not been scientifically established.
What It Is; Why It Works
Hemp Nettle is found in southern and central Europe. The plant grows 3 feet high, with large pale yellow flowers that are said to resemble a weasel's face. Its medicinal value lies in its ability to loosen phlegm. It also has an astringent, tightening effect on the tissues.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Hemp Nettle.
Special Cautions
At customary dosage levels, Hemp Nettle poses no known danger.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
To prepare a tea, pour boiling water over 2 grams (less than one-half teaspoonful) of crushed Hemp Nettle, steep for 5 minutes, then strain. The tea may be sweetened with honey.
Typical Dosage
Take the tea several times a day. The usual total daily dosage is 6 grams of the crush herb.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:17:52 am
Hibiscus
________________________________________
Latin name: Hibiscus sabdariffa
Other names: Guinea Sorrel, Jamaica Sorrel, Red Sorrel, Roselle
A Remedy For
Hibiscus flower is sometimes recommended for indigestion and loss of appetite, although its effectiveness for these problems has not been verified. Also unsubstantiated is its use as a remedy for colds, respiratory inflammation, phlegm, constipation, water retention, and circulation disorders.
What It Is; Why It Works
As herbal remedies go, Hibiscus is quite new to the scene. It wasn't until the 20th century that it began to appear in herbal tea mixtures. Hibiscus tea does have a laxative effect due to its high content of poorly absorbable fruit acids. Researchers have also found that extracts of Hibiscus leaf tend to relax the uterus and reduce blood pressure. None of these effects is pronounced enough to have won the herb a major following, however.
   The Hibiscus plant, a small, bushy annual with spectacular red and yellow blooms, originated near the source of the Niger river in Africa, but is now grown worldwide. Only the blossom is used medicinally.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Hibiscus.
Special Cautions
No problems or side effects have been documented.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
To make a tea, pour boiling water over 1.5 grams of crushed Hibiscus blossoms, steep for 5 to 10 minutes, then strain.
Typical Dosage
No recommendations are on record.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:18:28 am
Hibiscus
________________________________________
Latin name: Hibiscus sabdariffa
Other names: Guinea Sorrel, Jamaica Sorrel, Red Sorrel, Roselle
A Remedy For
Hibiscus flower is sometimes recommended for indigestion and loss of appetite, although its effectiveness for these problems has not been verified. Also unsubstantiated is its use as a remedy for colds, respiratory inflammation, phlegm, constipation, water retention, and circulation disorders.
What It Is; Why It Works
As herbal remedies go, Hibiscus is quite new to the scene. It wasn't until the 20th century that it began to appear in herbal tea mixtures. Hibiscus tea does have a laxative effect due to its high content of poorly absorbable fruit acids. Researchers have also found that extracts of Hibiscus leaf tend to relax the uterus and reduce blood pressure. None of these effects is pronounced enough to have won the herb a major following, however.
   The Hibiscus plant, a small, bushy annual with spectacular red and yellow blooms, originated near the source of the Niger river in Africa, but is now grown worldwide. Only the blossom is used medicinally.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Hibiscus.
Special Cautions
No problems or side effects have been documented.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
To make a tea, pour boiling water over 1.5 grams of crushed Hibiscus blossoms, steep for 5 to 10 minutes, then strain.
Typical Dosage
No recommendations are on record.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:19:04 am
Marigold
________________________________________
Latin name: Calendula officinalis
A Remedy For
   Sore throat
   Wounds and burns
Marigold has enjoyed a wide variety of applications in folk medicine. It has been taken internally for inflammation, stomach ulcers, menstrual cramps, swollen glands, liver problems, spasms, poor circulation, and worm infestation. Applied externally, it has been used to clean wounds and to treat chronic skin inflammation, varicose veins, leg ulcers, boils, inflammation of the rectum, eczema, and eye inflammation. While it definitely promotes wound healing, its other folk uses remain unproven.
   Marigold is an ingredient in many types of skin preparations, cosmetics, and preparations for dry skin, bee stings, and frostbite. It is also used to flush excess fluid from the body.
What It Is; Why It Works
The familiar orange/yellow Marigold plant grows to between 12 and 20 inches tall, and has a strong, unpleasant odor. The flower is the only part that's considered effective.
   Dried Marigold has been used in Europe for many years to treat a variety of skin problems. And laboratory research has in fact identified several compounds in the flower's essential oil capable of easing inflammation and combating bacterial and viral infections. Researchers have also found that when it's applied in ointment form to wounds, Marigold speeds the growth of new tissue and the new blood vessels to support it.
Avoid If...
There are no known reasons to avoid Marigold at recommended dosage levels.
Special Cautions
With frequent skin contact, there is a very slight chance (1 in 500) of a sensitivity reaction.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
A tea can be made from dried, crushed Marigold leaves using 1 cup of boiling water over 1 to 2 grams (approximately 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls) of herb and steeping for 10 minutes. Used as a gargle or mouthwash for sores in the mouth, the tea can also be poured over an absorbent cloth and applied to the skin.
   Commercial preparations of Marigold, usually labeled "Calendula," are available in ointment, gel, and lotion form for external use, and in tablets to be taken internally.
Typical Dosage
For sore throat, take several cups of Marigold tea daily. For ulcers, take a double-strength tea 3 times a day. When using a commercial preparation, follow the manufacturer's directions. Strengths may vary.
Store away from light and moisture. Do not keep for more than 3 years.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:19:59 am
Marjoram
________________________________________
Latin name: Origanum majorana
A Remedy For
Marjoram is sometimes used as a remedy for stomach pain and the common cold, although its effectiveness for these problems has never been fully verified. Other unsubstantiated uses include treatment of headache, dizziness, and severe cough. Homeopathic practitioners recommend it for nervous conditions.
What It Is; Why It Works
This common household herb exhibits germicidal activity in lab tests, and was formerly used as a mild antiseptic. The dried leaves and flowers are considered medicinal, as is Marjoram oil.
   The Latin name "origanum" is derived from the Greek words "oros" meaning mountain and "ganos" meaning joy, presumably a reference to the bright appearance that the plants lend to hillsides. A bushy little herb less than a foot high, Marjoram originated in the southeastern Mediterranean region and is now produced in Egypt, France, and central Europe.
Avoid If...
Do not use Marjoram salve on infants or small children.
Special Cautions
When used at customary dosage levels for limited periods of time, Marjoram poses no problems. However, you should avoid extended use.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
Marjoram is taken internally as a tea, and is used externally in mouthwashes and compresses. To prepare the tea, pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls of Marjoram, steep for 5 minutes, and strain.
Typical Dosage
Sip 1 to 2 cups of Marjoram tea throughout the day.
   Dried Marjoram may be stored for up to 2 years in air-tight containers.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:20:54 am
Oats
________________________________________
Latin name: Avena sativa
Other names: Groats, Oatmeal
A Remedy For
   Skin inflammation
   Warts
Oat preparations are taken internally for a wide variety of ailments, including digestive problems, gallbladder complaints, kidney disorders, rheumatism, heart disease, chest and throat complaints, fatigue, diabetes, constipation, depression, diarrhea, anxiety, stress, nerve disorders, bladder problems, sleeplessness, gout, connective tissue disorders, the symptoms of old age, and narcotic and tobacco withdrawal. However, their value for these problems remains unconfirmed; and only external use for skin conditions is considered clearly effective. Oatmeal baths are frequently given to relieve itching from local skin irritations.
   The straw from oats is also used as a remedy, for inflammatory skin diseases accompanied by itch, as well as for impetigo (a contagious skin eruption), frostbite, eye problems, bladder and rheumatic disorders, gout, and disorders of the metabolism. In foot baths, it's employed as a remedy for chronically cold or tired feet, and as a tea it's taken for flu and coughs. Effectiveness of the straw has not, however, been studied.
What It Is; Why It Works
Cultivated worldwide, Oat is an annual, light green grass with a bushy root that grows from 24 to 40 inches high. Oats are used as an additive in natural cosmetics, and are found in a variety of household foodstuffs and animal feeds. Oat straw is the dried, threshed leaf and stem of the plant.
   Oats have been shown to lower cholesterol and combat the production of prostaglandins (hormones that act on the blood vessels and other organs in the body).
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Oats
Special Cautions
No health hazards have been reported.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions are known.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
Rolled oats, such as Oatmeal, are the plant's dried seeds, treated with steam, then crushed.
   You can make an Oat tea by mixing 3 grams (a heaping half-teaspoonful) with a cup of boiling water. Allow to cool, then strain.
   To prepare a bath additive from Oat straw, add 31/2 ounces of the chopped straw to 3 quarts of water, boil for 20 minutes, then add to the bath water.
Typical Dosage
As a tea, Oats can be taken repeatedly throughout the day and shortly before bedtime.
   Store away from light and moisture.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:21:36 am
Onion
________________________________________
Latin name: Allium cepa
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Bronchitis
   Colds
   Cough
   Fever
   Hardening of the arteries
   High blood pressure
   Indigestion
   Sore throat
   Tendency to infection
In folk medicine, Onion has also been used for whooping cough, chest pain (angina), gallbladder complaints, dehydration, menstrual problems, parasitic infections, and diabetes. It is applied externally for insect bites, wounds, mild burns, warts, boils, and bruises. These folk uses all remain unproven.
What It Is; Why It Works
It's the same ingredient that brings tears to your eyes that lends Onions their ability to fight disease. This sulfur compound thins the blood and helps prevent dangerous clots while lowering blood pressure and possibly reducing cholesterol levels. Onions also possess the ability to kill a wide variety of germs. And, for asthma victims, Onion extract may even relieve allergy-induced bronchial constriction.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Onion.
Special Cautions
Taking large quantities can cause stomach problems. Frequent hand contact may cause eczema (a weeping, itching rash).
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
You can make a medicinal oil by crushing an Onion and stirring in an equal amount of fatty oil. Let the mixture stand for 48 hours, then filter the oil.
   A popular form of Onion extract is made with pressed Onion juice and syrup, using 500 grams (l pound, l ounce) of Onions, 500 grams (1 pint) of water, 100 grams (3 ounces) of honey, and 350 grams (12 ounces) of sugar.
   You can prepare an Onion tincture by soaking 100 grams (3 ounces) of minced Onions in 300 grams (10 ounces) of alcohol for 10 days.
Typical Dosage
The usual oral dosage is:
Onion tincture: 4 to 5 teaspoonfuls daily
Onion syrup: 4 to 5 tablespoons daily
Fresh Onion: 50 grams (12/3 ounces) daily
Dried Onion: 20 grams (two-thirds ounce) daily
   For external use, apply slices directly to the skin, cover the affected area with a juice-soaked cloth, or spread juice across the area.
   When using a commercial preparation, follow the manufacturer's labeling. Strengths may vary.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:22:19 am
Oregano
________________________________________
Latin name: Origanum vulgare
Other names: Mountain Mint, Wild Marjoram, Winter Marjoram, Wintersweet
A Remedy For
Oregano is considered a remedy for respiratory problems such as coughs and bronchitis, although there is no conclusive proof of its effectiveness. Unverified uses in folk medicine include treatment of bloating, gas, urinary tract problems, painful menstruation, rheumatoid arthritis, swollen glands, and lack of perspiration.
What It Is; Why It Works
It's difficult to think of a common kitchen herb like Oregano as a medical remedy, but it has in fact been used as a drug since the time of the ancient Greeks and Chinese. In China, doctors prescribed it to relieve fever, vomiting, diarrhea, jaundice, and itchy skin, while the Greeks made compresses from the leaves to treat sores and aching muscles.
   The primary ingredients in Oregano are thymol and carvacrol, which are also found in thyme. These compounds, researchers have found, help loosen phlegm in the lungs and relieve spasms in the bronchial passages. Many commercial cough remedies, including cough drops and skin rubs such as Vicks VapoRub, contain thymol.
   Harvested during the flowering season and dried on the field or under a roof, Oregano has bright purple flowers and an aromatic scent. Its medicinal value lies in the oil found in its leaves.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Oregano.
Special Cautions
At customary dosage levels, Oregano poses no
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phoenixtears43

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2007, 02:27:46 AM »

Bless Up Sistah Vee,  great info!!  InI have been looking for natural remidies to replace medicine i use from time to time.  Thanks :)


Jah Bless
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sistahvee

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  • Rasta Wombman will Prevail
Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2007, 02:41:52 AM »

Radish
________________________________________
Latin name: Raphanus sativus
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Bronchitis
   Colds
   Cough
   Fever
   Sore throat
   Tendency to infection
The juice of this common vegetable is used primarily for digestive disorders and upper respiratory inflammation. In Asian medicine, it's also taken for headache, liver disease, and pain, but its effectiveness for these problems has not been scientifically confirmed.
What It Is; Why It Works
The thick, tangy root is the medicinal part of the plant. It promotes digestive secretions, stimulates the bowels, and helps kill germs.
   Unknown in the wild, the Radish was probably domesticated in the Far East. It was already under cultivation when the pharaohs reigned in Egypt.
Avoid If...
Do not take large doses of Radish if you have gallstones; it could cause painful spasms in the biliary tract.
Special Cautions
High doses of radish can irritate the digestive tract.
Possible Drug Interactions
No drug interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
Radish can be grated or pressed to produce juice. For whooping cough, grated radish can be combined with honey. Grate one radish, mix with honey, and allow the mixture to stand for 10 hours.
Typical Dosage
Radish is taken orally.
Radish juice: One-half tablespoonful of pressed juice several times a day, up to a maximum of 4 to 6 tablespoonfuls daily.
Radish/honey mixture: For whooping cough, take spoonfuls throughout the day.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:28:18 am
Sage
________________________________________
Latin name: Salvia officinalis
A Remedy For
   Appetite loss
   Excessive perspiration
   Sore throat
In folk medicine, Sage is also taken for bloating, diarrhea, and intestinal inflammation. As a rinse and gargle, it's used for bleeding gums. Applied externally, it treats mild injuries and skin inflammation. In Asia, it's considered a remedy for hemorrhoids, blood in the urine, bloody phlegm, and fluid in the abdomen; and homeopathic practitioners prescribe it for excessive flow of breast milk. However, its effectiveness for all of these problems remains unverified.
   Researchers have also been investigating the value of Sage as a treatment for Type II, non-insulin dependent diabetes. While one study has shown positive results, further confirmation is needed.
What It Is; Why It Works
Valued in the U.S primarily as a seasoning, Sage has a long history of medicinal use abroad. It has been taken for conditions ranging from sexually transmitted disease to insect bites, and is still used in Europe as a gargle for sore throats. It exhibits antibacterial qualities, inhibits viral and fungal growth, reduces perspiration and other secretions, and acts as an astringent, tightening and drying the tissues.
   The plant's medicinal value resides in its crushed, dried leaves and the oil extracted from its flowers, leaves, and stems. Native to the Mediterranean region, Sage is now grown in all of Europe and North America.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Sage.
Special Cautions
Although there is little danger of side effects under ordinary circumstances, extended use of Sage can produce the same symptoms as an overdose. (See "Overdosage," below.)
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Do not take this medication during pregnancy.
How to Prepare
Powdered Sage can be made into a remedy for bronchitis by mixing 12/3 ounces of the powdered drug with 22/3 ounces of honey.
   Gargles and rinses may be prepared by mixing 2.5 grams of Sage (or 2 to 3 drops of Sage oil) with 3 ounces of water. Alternatively, use 5 grams (1 teaspoonful) of alcoholic extract in 1 glass of water. Undiluted alcoholic extract may also be applied directly to inflamed mucous membranes.
Typical Dosage
The usual daily dosage is:
Dried Sage: 4 to 6 grams (about 1 teaspoonful)
Essential oil of Sage: 2 to 6 drops
Sage tincture (alcoholic extract): 2.5 to 7.5 grams (one-half to 11/2 teaspoonfuls)
Sage liquid extract: 1.5 to 3 grams (about one-quarter to one-half teaspoonful)
Sage honey: 1 teaspoonful in the morning and before bedtime
Powdered Sage: 1 capsule before each meal for excessive perspiration
   Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available. Store away from light and humidity.
Overdosage
The danger of overdose is greater if you are taking an alcoholic extract or the essential oil. To overdose on Sage leaves, you must consume at least 15 grams.
   Symptoms of overdose include a feeling of warmth, rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and convulsions. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:29:37 am
Senna
________________________________________
Latin name: Cassia species
A Remedy For
   Constipation
Because of its stool-softening action, Senna is especially useful for people with hemorrhoids or anal fissures. It's also recommended following rectal surgery, and can be used to cleanse the bowel prior to diagnostic procedures.
   In Asia, Senna is also used for bronchitis, dysentery, seizures, fever, indigestion, and skin diseases; but its effectiveness for these disorders has never been verified.
What It Is; Why It Works
First prescribed by ancient Arabian physicians, today Senna is one of the more widely used laxatives. It's the active ingredient in such products as Senokot, Fletcher's Castoria, and Ex-Lax Gentle Nature.
   Senna grows in most tropical regions of the world. Both its leaves and its seeds are medicinal. It relieves constipation by stimulating the colon, thus hastening passage of the contents. Because there's less time for fluid to be absorbed from the stool, it tends to remain soft.
Avoid If...
Do not use Senna if you have an intestinal blockage, appendicitis, or an inflammatory intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Not for children under 12.
Special Cautions
Senna occasionally causes abdominal cramps. Do not use it for more than 1 to 2 weeks without your doctor's approval. Long-term use can deplete the body's potassium levels, leading to such problems as muscle weakness, bone loss, kidney disorders, water retention, and blood in the urine.
Possible Drug Interactions
Loss of potassium from overuse of Senna may increase the effect of heart medications such as digitalis and digoxin (Lanoxin), and may interfere with drugs that steady the heartbeat, possibly leading to heartbeat irregularities.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Do not use Senna if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
How to Prepare
Senna is available as a crushed herb, and in liquid and powdered extracts.
   There are two ways you can prepare a Senna tea. Either pour hot--but not boiling--water over 0.5 to 2 grams (about one-quarter teaspoonful) of crushed herb, steep for 10 minutes, and strain, or steep the herb in cold water for 10 to 12 hours, then strain. The slower, cold-water method is thought to leave less resin in the tea, and it's the resin that's responsible for abdominal cramps.
   Allow 10 to 12 hours for the herb to take effect.
Typical Dosage
Senna is taken orally. The usual daily dosage delivers 20 to 60 milligrams of its active ingredient. The strength of commercial preparations may vary, so follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
Abdominal cramps could be a sign of overdose. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:30:27 am
St. John's Wort
________________________________________
Latin name: Hypericum perforatum
Other names: Amber, Goatweed, Hardhay, Klamath Weed, Tipton Weed
A Remedy For
   Blunt injuries
   Depression and anxiety
   Skin inflammation
   Wounds and burns
Although its effectiveness for other ailments has not been proven, St. John's Wort has also been used to treat sleep disturbances, gallbladder disorders, gastritis, bronchitis, asthma, diarrhea, bed-wetting, rheumatism, muscle pain, and gout.
What It Is; Why It Works
St. John's Wort is believed to combat depression by boosting the levels of certain chemical messengers in the brain. Like the prescription antidepressant Prozac, it seems to increase the amount of serotonin available to the nervous system. It also tends to promote higher levels of the chemical messengers norepinephrine and dopamine. In some clinical trials, daily doses of 800 to 900 milligrams of St. John's Wort have proven to be as effective as 20 milligrams of Prozac or 75 milligrams of the antidepressant Tofranil.
   Applied to the skin, oily preparations of the herb have an antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action, though they seem to have no effect on viruses.
   St. John's Wort is a golden yellow perennial flower that secretes a red liquid when pinched. Cut at the start of the flowering season and processed in bunches, it must be dried quickly to preserve its oil and secretions.
   This plant has been used medicinally for over 2,000 years. Ancient Greeks believed that its odor repelled evil spirits. Early Christians named the plant in honor of St. John the Baptist because they believed it released its blood-red oil on the 29th of August, the day the saint was beheaded.
Avoid if...
There are no known reasons to avoid St. John's Wort at recommended dosage levels.
Special Cautions
With heavy use, St. John's Wort increases sensitivity to sunlight. To avoid a sunburn, minimize your exposure to the sun while using this medication. This herb can also cause bloating and constipation.
Possible Drug Interactions
Do not use St. John's Wort while taking a prescription drug classified as an MAO inhibitor, such as Nardil or Parnate. At least in theory, a dangerous interaction is possible.
   It's also best to avoid combining St. John's Wort with serotonin-boosting drugs such as Celexa, Luvox, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, and Zoloft. The excessive levels of serotonin that may result can trigger sweating, tremors, flushing, confusion, and agitation.
   If you are taking medications for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, do not use St. John's Wort. The herb is known to interfere with at least one HIV drug–Crixivan–and may reduce the effect of others, including Agenerase, Fortovase, Invirase, Norvir, and Viracept. St. John's Wort should also be avoided by people taking Neoral, a drug used to keep transplant patients from rejecting their new organs. It can inhibit the drug's life-saving effect.
   If you use a hormonal form of contraception, you should remember that oral contraceptive failure has occasionally been reported in women taking St. John's Wort.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
A tea can be made from the leaves and flowering tops of the plant using 2 heaping teaspoonfuls of the herb steeped in 5 ounces of boiling water for 10 minutes.
   A medicinal oil can be prepared by soaking the crushed flowers in olive oil for several weeks in the sun. Once the oil acquires a reddish color, it can be taken internally or applied directly to the skin to relieve inflammation and promote healing.
Typical Dosage
For depression, the typical dosage of standardized extract is 300 milligrams taken 3 times a day. The extract is available in tablet, capsule, and liquid form. Common brands are made by Celestial Seasonings, Centrum Herbals, Nature's Way, and Schiff. Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
   A treatment regimen of 4 to 6 weeks is typically recommended for depression. If you feel no improvement, check with your doctor. You may need a different therapy.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.      



Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:32:35 am
Stinging Nettle
________________________________________
Latin name: Urtica dioica
Other names: Dwarf Nettle, Greater Nettle, Nettle Wort
A Remedy For
ROOT
________________________________________
   Prostate enlargement

   A number of studies have confirmed the value of Stinging Nettle root for symptomatic relief of enlarged prostate. However, it's important to remember that the herb does not cure the enlargement itself, but merely relieves symptoms such as frequent urination and weak urinary flow. For treatment of the underlying problem, other drugs or surgical procedures are needed, so be sure to consult your doctor.

PLANT AND LEAF
________________________________________
   Kidney and bladder stones
   Rheumatism
   Urinary tract infections
The above-ground parts of the Stinging Nettle plant have no effect on the prostate, but do posses a diuretic action that increases the production of urine. This makes them useful when it's necessary to flush out the urinary system. They are applied externally as a remedy for oily hair and dandruff.
   In folk medicine, the above-ground parts of the plant are taken to improve the blood, as well as serving as an ingredient in various "diabetic teas." However, there's no indication of its effectiveness for these purposes, and such uses are not recommended.
   In homeopathic practice, all parts of the Stinging Nettle plant are considered an important remedy for itching, rheumatism, and conditions of the spleen.
What It Is; Why It Works
The Stinging Nettle plant, which reaches a height of 2 to 41/2 feet, is entirely covered with prickly hairs. It has been used medicinally in a variety of ways, including a bizarre treatment for rheumatism called "urtication" in which the patient is lashed with the above-ground parts of the plant. Today, an extract of the plant is still used externally as a dandruff remedy. All other uses require internal administration.
Avoid If...
Do not take the above-ground portion of the plant if you are retaining water due to a heart or kidney condition.
Special Cautions
On rare occasions, taking the above-ground portion of the plant may cause swelling or skin reactions. The root occasionally causes mild stomach and intestinal problems.
   When taking the above-ground portion of the plant, be sure to drink at least 8 large glasses of fluid a day.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
ROOT
________________________________________

To make a tea, mix 1.5 grams (about 1 teaspoonful) of coarsely powdered root with cold water, bring to a boil for 1 minute, cover, steep for 10 minutes, then strain.

PLANT AND LEAF
________________________________________

To make a tea, mix 1.5 grams (about 2 teaspoonfuls) of finely cut herb with cold water, bring briefly to a boil, steep for 10 minutes, then strain.
   For external use, apply an alcohol solution (tincture).
Typical Dosage
ROOT
________________________________________

The usual daily dosage is 4 to 6 grams (about 3 to 41/2 teaspoonfuls)

PLANT AND LEAF
________________________________________

Drink the tea several times daily. The total daily amount of cut herb to be used is 8 to 12 grams (10 to 15 teaspoonfuls).
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:33:58 am
Thyme
________________________________________
Latin name: Thymus vulgaris
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Cough
Thyme is also used as a treatment for inflamed sinuses, nose, throat, and larynx, as a remedy for whooping cough, and as an antibacterial and deodorant skin rub. In folk medicine it has been used as a digestive aid, a urinary disinfectant, a diuretic (to flush excess fluid from the body), a remedy for intestinal worms, and an anti-gas medication. Its effectiveness for such problems has not, however, been clinically verified.
What It Is; Why It Works
Recognized today mostly for its culinary benefits, Thyme has played an important role in medicine from the Middle Ages onward. Thymol, its active ingredient, helps loosen phlegm, combats bronchial spasms, and discourages growth of bacteria. First noted by a German pharmacist in 1725, thymol eventually replaced carbolic acid as a safer, yet effective, antiseptic. Today it's found in such popular over-the-counter products as Listerine mouthwash and Vicks VapoRub.
Avoid If...
There are no known medical conditions that preclude the use of Thyme.
Special Cautions
No harmful effects are known with proper use.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How to Prepare
To make a tea, mix 1.5 to 2 grams (approximately 1 to 11/2 teaspoonfuls) of dried herb with boiling water. Steep for 10 minutes, then strain.
Typical Dosage
Thyme is available in crushed, powdered, and liquid extract form, and in combination with other herbs that have an expectorant action. Dosage of the liquid extract is 1 to 2 grams taken 1 to 3 times daily. Thyme tea may be taken several times a day, as needed. Take no more than 10 grams of Thyme daily.
   Because strengths of commercial preparations may vary, follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:34:53 am
Wild Yam
________________________________________
Latin name: Dioscorea villosa
Other names: China Root, Colic Root, Devil's Bones, Rheumatism Root, Yuma
A Remedy For
   High cholesterol
An extract of Wild Yam has been shown to lower triglycerides and raise levels of the "good" HDL cholesterol that combats build-up of plaque in the arteries. Wild Yam is also considered a remedy for rheumatism, gallbladder problems, cramps, nerve pain, painful menstruation, upset stomach, and morning sickness, but its effectiveness for these problems remains to be confirmed.
What It Is; Why It Works
Wild Yam calms muscular spasms and seems to have anti-inflammatory properties. It also stimulates the flow of bile and promotes perspiration. It does not, as some believe, serve as a natural source of the female hormone progesterone. It is used in the production of artificial progesterone, but it will not yield the hormone in the absence of a chemical conversion process that the body can't supply.
   Wild Yam is a member of the huge Dioscorea family, which includes the common potato. It is named for Dioscorides, the 1st century Greek physician whose botanical writings were the standard for more than a thousand years. Native to North America, the plant is now cultivated in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions worldwide. The dried root is the medicinal part of the plant.
Avoid If...
No known medical conditions preclude the use of Wild Yam.
Special Cautions
Large doses have been known to cause nausea.
Possible Drug Interactions
Wild Yam may reduce the effectiveness of the arthritis drug Indocin. It may also add to the effects of medications that contain estrogen.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare Wild Yam is available as a liquid extract, and in capsule form.
Typical Dosage
Liquid: 2 to 3 milliliters (about one-half teaspoonful) 3 to 4 times per day
Capsules: 1 to 2 pills 3 times per day
   Because the strength of commercial preparations may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available.
Overdosage
Poisoning is conceivable. Take care to avoid excessive doses.

Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:35:57 am
Watercress
________________________________________
Latin name: Nasturtium officinale
Other name: Indian Cress
A Remedy For
   Bronchitis
   Cough
High in Vitamin C, Watercress is used as a general tonic, and its bitter taste is thought to stimulate the appetite and improve digestion. In Italy, compresses made from Watercress are used to treat arthritis. Homeopathic practitioners prescribe it for nervous conditions, constipation, and liver disorders. Only as a remedy for cough and bronchitis, however, has it been conclusively found effective.
What It Is; Why It Works
Known primarily for its use in salads and cooking, Watercress has a radish-like taste and emits a tangy fragrance when rubbed. Its scientific name comes from the Latin words "nasus tortus," or "screwed-up nose," describing the usual reaction to its stinging smell. The plant is found almost all over the world and is grown commercially in many regions.
   Watercress contains mustard oil, a compound that flushes excess water from the body. Researchers have also shown that the herb kills bacteria.
Avoid If...
Do not take Watercress if you have a stomach or intestinal ulcer or a kidney inflammation. Not for children under 4.
Special Cautions
At routine dosage levels, Watercress poses no problems. However, eating large quantities of freshly-harvested Watercress can irritate the stomach and intestines due to its mustard oil content.
Possible Drug Interactions
No interactions have been reported.
Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
No harmful effects are known.
How To Prepare
Watercress can be made into a tea. Pour 5 ounces (about one-half cup) of boiling water over 2 grams (about one-half teaspoonful) of the crushed herb, cover, steep for 10 minutes, and strain. You can drink 2 to 3 cups daily before meals.
Typical Dosage
Watercress is taken orally. The usual daily dosage is:
Dried Watercress: 4 to 6 grams (about 1 teaspoonful)
Fresh Watercress: 20 to 30 grams (about 11/3 to 2 tablespoonfuls)
Watercress juice: 60 to 150 grams (about one-quarter to one-half cup)
Overdosage
No information on overdosage is available.       



Posted on: March 16, 2007, 01:36:53 am
Bless Up Phoenixtears

InI have had a terrible time finding information on plants, natural cures and remedies, etc.  Since InI now have this InI thought it only kind to share it with other Idren who are having difficulties in the same area.  InI hope others would Itinue to share with us all as they too find solutions and remedies.  Glad the I found something he's been searhing for.  InI will Itinue to add as InI find more.

Nuff Love

Sistah Vee
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RAS_CHUCKY11

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2007, 07:28:25 PM »

Greetings

Nice sharing sistahvee as natural is the way to go for everything..But I an I still waiting for the I to post "GANJA"  ;D

Bless
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phoenixtears43

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2007, 07:43:17 PM »

GANJA
Quote
It's good for the flu
It's good for asthma
Good for tuberculosis
Even umara composis

-Peter Tosh    :P
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sistahvee

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2007, 07:44:05 PM »

Bless Up Ras Chucky

Sistah Nya is the expert on Ganja cures and remedies..  Give the I a shout and encourage her to post it for All of us who wants to know more..

Nuff Love

Sistah Vee
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RAS_CHUCKY11

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2007, 07:51:12 PM »

(Peter Tosh)

Legalize it
Don't criticize it
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
And I will advertise it

Some call it tamjee
Some call it the weed
Some call it Marijuana
Some of them call it Ganja

Nevermind, got to legalize it
Don't criticize it
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
And I will advertise it

Singers smoke it
And players of instrument, too
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
That's the best thing you can do

Doctors smoke it
Nurses smoke it
Judges smoke it
Even the laywers too

So you've got to legalize it
Don't criticize it
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
And I will advertise it

It's good for the flu
It's good for asthma
Good for tuberculosis
Even numara thrombosis

Got to legalize it
Don't criticize it
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
And I will advertise it

Birds eat it
Ants love it
Fowls eat it
Cooks love to bake with it

So you've got to legalize it
Don't criticize it
Legalize it, yeah, yeah
And I will advertise it
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Herbalist_rasta

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2007, 07:25:48 AM »

This One Herb Ive been researching, coz a lot of people here die on Viagra.

American Ginseng (Panax ginseng)
Contains: Natural Sugar, pectin, minerals , vitamin D
Uses: relieve Physical and Mental Fatigue
        help to improve stamina, concentration and resistance
        used for depressive states associated with sexual inadequacy
        mostly for people arising from the onset of old age.

How: Dried Ginseng roots brewed as tea.


There is herb I am currently using whenever I have a fever, very good and very effective,
 it grows naturally in my place,
Im still searching what is the Scientific name of this , The local name is "Tawa-tawa"


Bless
Onelove
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jah_2_love

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2007, 03:10:16 AM »

Greetings in the name of the MOST HIGH JAH RASTAFARI

This here topic is a vault of information.  I know some about natural remedies but I learned a lot of things here I didn't know.  Thank you all for the infomation.  I am going to pass along this information to others.

jah_2_Love
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Love_Sponge

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2007, 01:42:35 PM »

Much love to sistah_vee for starting this post Ini have always been involved with using herbs and plants for everyday life but had to stop for a while :(

InI have been looking around for some natural ways to clean the house for Ini are tired especially in winter of having dry cracked hands that smell of bleach and other chemicals then InI managed to find these so I thought that Iwould share them and as soon as Ini can find others Ini will post them............


DISINFECTANT:

Mix 1/2 cup of Borax with 2 gallons of hot water
add a few sprigs of fresh thyme
steep for 10mins,strain and cool
Store in a recycled spray plastic bottle


FLOOR CLEANER:
Mix 1 cup of white vinegar with 2 gallons of hot water

NB: If you have a greasy floor add a 1/4 cup washing soda and 1 tablesppon vegetable oil based soap


WINDOW WASHING FLUID:
1 cup of vinegar(any kind) with 4 cups hot water


OVEN CLEANER:
Make a paste with baking soda and hot water
Rub salt into the hard stains with a half cut fresh lemon



That is all InI have managed to find so far,as soon as i find somemore I will add some more and add onto sistah_vee's list as soon as Ini have a little bit more time;)

Blessed Love to all
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Molliebaz

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2007, 02:23:12 PM »

This is a great subject.  White vinegar is a very good all round cleaner.  It will clean up limescale from bathroom and kitchen taps if some is put onto a paper towel and left soaking around the tap overnight.  Soda crystals soften water and are good to use in an automatic washing machine to keep the pipes clear.

Here's a tip I picked up from West Indian women - after using the juice of a lime or lemon - leave the remainder of the fruit in the washing up bowl when rinsing the dishes.   The natural acid of the fruit will remove any remaining grease, make the plates shine and will make the sink smell nice.

I dont know if this is true, but I have heard that leaving a peeled onion in a room when decorating will take away the smell of the paint fumes - does anybody know if this is correct ?
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jah_2_love

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2007, 05:05:47 PM »

Greetings in the name of the MOST HIGH JAH RASTAFARI

I was reading through this list of natural remedies last night and today it struck me that the Sistren here may be able to assist me in finding some information I have not been able to locate.  The post with CARBUNCLES got me thinking that there is much the Sistren here know regarding these that I still don't know.

InI's daughter, 24. is Type 2 diabetic.  She too has been told the same as the sistren in the Carbuncles post.  That her diabetes makes her prone to regular Carbuncles.  However she also has been suffering from regular yeast infections of late.  Some infections lasting for weeks and quite irritable.  She has been using creams prescribed at the clinic which gives some ease, but temporary and costly.  This too is being blamed on her diabetes which she is already taking metformin for. 

Does any of the Idren here know of some reasons for this as she eats quite healty, better than me as a matter of fact, excercises and drinks an awful lot of water daily.  Is there a natural remedy known to cure/ease YEAST INFECTIONS and/or Carbuncles?

Many thanks in advance.

jah_2_love
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Molliebaz

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2007, 08:17:30 PM »

Natural live yoghurt eaten and used instead of the creams can help with yeast infections.   Yeast infection, or Thrush, or Candidas Albicans is caused when the natural bacteria in the gut become unbalanced.  Also, replacing the bacteria with healthy bacteria " lactobaccilus acidophillus " can help to rebalance the bacteria in the gut.   A word of warning for all those that suffer from yeast infections - do not use soap or feminine deodorants or talc - this can cause infections.  Plenty of water used instead will soothe and keep the body clean - the female body has its own marvellous way of keeping clean without chemical soaps.  Care should also be taken to not spread bacteria to the vagina - wipe from front to back when using the toilet.

Cranberry Juice neutralises the acidity of urine in cases of cystitis. 

I hope your daughter finds some relief.

One Love
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Zenroa0918

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Re: Natural Remedies and Cures
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2009, 02:55:14 PM »

Knowing of it,that her diabetes makes her decumbent to approved Carbuncles.  However she aswell has been adversity from approved aggrandize infections of late.  Some infections abiding for weeks and absolutely irritable.



________________
Refrigerator filter
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