SLAVES FOR SALE DOCUMENTS

(1/2) > >>

RAS_CHUCKY11:
http://www.afrolumens.org/slavery/buying.html#Arranging%20a%20Sale


Posted on: September 01, 2007, 12:38:42 amAdvertisements for Slave Ship Arrivals
"Just imported from Africa, and to be sold by JAMES SIMMONS, At his Store in Tun Alley, a Choice Parcel of young SLAVES."

The above advertisement was placed in The Pennsylvania Gazette on May 24, 1759, and is typical of the ads placed by Philadelphia merchants offering slaves for sale. Many times, the slaves would be sold right from the slave ships tied up at one of the city's wharfs:

"Just imported from the Coast of Africa, in the Schooner PENELOPE, now lying at Mr. Hughe's Wharff,
A PARCEL of likely Negroe Boys and Girls, and to be sold by THOMAS CARPENTER, on board said Schooner." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, August 14, 1760)

"Just imported in the Sloop Company, Captain Hodgson, from the Coast of Africa, A PARCEL OF LIKELY NEGROE SLAVES; Which may be seen on board said Sloop, lying off Cooper's Ferry.
For Terms, apply to SAMUEL and ARCHIBALD McCALL, and JAMES WALLACE and Company." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, October 01, 1761)


Posted on: September 01, 2007, 12:39:59 am"TO BE SOLD,
On Saturday the 27th Instant, at the London Coffee House, TWELVE or Fourteen valuable NEGROES, consisting of young Men, Women, Boys and Girls; they have all had the Small Pox, can talk English, and are seasoned to the Country. The Sale to begin at Twelve o'Clock." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, July 18, 1765)

More common are advertisements such as the ones listed below. Slaveholders wishing to sell one or two slaves arranged for "publick vendue" at the Coffee House and placed newspaper ads giving the details of the sale:

"ON Saturday next will be sold at publick Vendue, at the London Coffee house, about Noon, A very strong likely Negroe Boy, about 17 Years old, has had the small pox, understands taking Care of Horses perfectly, can lay Cloth, and wait on Table for a Gentleman Family, and can do every Part of hard Labour. He will be put up at Fifty Pounds, and not under. Enquire of Mr. JUDAH FOULKE." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, May 04, 1758)

"A LIKELY NEGROE WENCH,
than can cook and wash, and has had the Small Pox, to be sold at public Vendue, at the London Coffee House, on Saturday the 20th Instant, at Twelve o'Clock." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, December 11, 1760)


Posted on: September 01, 2007, 12:40:49 amslavery in pennsylvania
buying a slave
article by George F. Nagle, Afrolumens Project editor.
see also the article Pennsylvania Slave Merchants

page contents

Introduction
Advertisements for Slave Ship Arrivals
Public Sales at The London Coffee House
Private Sales
Arranging a Sale
Conclusion

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Introduction
The year 1684 saw the first commercial sale of slaves in Pennsylvania as the British merchant ship Isabella landed at Philadelphia with a cargo that included 150 African slaves. They were immediately purchased by the local Quaker settlers, who were in need of manpower to help clear the land in the three year-old colony. Slave imports after that year were small in number until the 1730's, when a decrease in the duty levied upon imported slaves, combined with a laxity on the part of the provincial collector to collect any imposts at all between 1731 and 1761, combined to allow a surge in the number of slaves brought into the colony by slave merchants. The imports leveled off again, probably due to a preference by buyers for European indentured servants and redemptioners, until the start of the Seven Years' War.
The war, which began in 1756, caught the British army short of manpower. They began to recruit new Scotch-Irish and German laborers who had been arriving in the colony in large numbers. Because the Crown did not compensate the owners for the full value of these servants, settlers, faced with a probable financial loss if they bought European servants, turned to African slaves for forced labor. The numbers of Africans brought into Philadelphia ports reached its high point in the next several years as a result of this new demand.

Advertisements for Slave Ship Arrivals
"Just imported from Africa, and to be sold by JAMES SIMMONS, At his Store in Tun Alley, a Choice Parcel of young SLAVES."

The above advertisement was placed in The Pennsylvania Gazette on May 24, 1759, and is typical of the ads placed by Philadelphia merchants offering slaves for sale. Many times, the slaves would be sold right from the slave ships tied up at one of the city's wharfs:

"Just imported from the Coast of Africa, in the Schooner PENELOPE, now lying at Mr. Hughe's Wharff,
A PARCEL of likely Negroe Boys and Girls, and to be sold by THOMAS CARPENTER, on board said Schooner." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, August 14, 1760)

"Just imported in the Sloop Company, Captain Hodgson, from the Coast of Africa, A PARCEL OF LIKELY NEGROE SLAVES; Which may be seen on board said Sloop, lying off Cooper's Ferry.
For Terms, apply to SAMUEL and ARCHIBALD McCALL, and JAMES WALLACE and Company." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, October 01, 1761)

Note that the last advertisement mentions the name of the Philadelphia mercantile company, McCall, Wallace and Company, which was selling the slaves. The previous advertisement notes that the slaves were "to be sold by THOMAS CARPENTER, on board said Schooner," but I don't know if Carpenter was a local merchant. Another prominent Philadelphia mercantile firm which dealt in slaves was Willing, Morris and Company, whose advertisement appears below:

"Just imported from the Coast of Africa, in the Brig Nancy, and to be sold at Wilmington, in New Castle County (where Attendance is given) by Willing, Morris, and Company, Of PHILADELPHIA,
ONE Hundred and Seventy fine Gold Coast NEGROES.

N.B. In the West India Islands, where Slaves are best known, those of the Gold Coast are in much greater Esteem, and higher valued, than any others, on Account of their natural good Dispositions, and being better capable of hard Labour." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, May 06, 1762)

An interesting aspect of the advertisement by Willing, Morris and Company, is that they brought the slave ship into the port at Wilmington, Delaware, thus avoiding the heavy £10 duty newly imposed upon imported slaves. This had become a common practice among Pennsylvania slave merchants, who would often provide transport from Philadelphia to Wilmington for anyone wanting to inspect the slaves at the ship. Paying the duty, which was strictly enforced by the provincial collector, then became the responsibility of the buyer if the slave was taken across the border into Pennsylvania.

Public Sales at The London Coffee House
A popular location for the public sale of slaves in Philadelphia was the London Coffee House. Slaves sold by public auction at this location were less likely to be newly arrived Africans, but Blacks already owned by local slaveholders. Persons wishing to purchase a slave would watch the local newspaper for published notices of sales, and either bid in person or designate someone to act as an agent and bid on their behalf. The following advertisement is unusual in that fourteen slaves are up for auction. Most public slave sales at this location involved one or two slaves at one time; this event no doubt drew a large crowd for its novelty
"TO BE SOLD,
On Saturday the 27th Instant, at the London Coffee House, TWELVE or Fourteen valuable NEGROES, consisting of young Men, Women, Boys and Girls; they have all had the Small Pox, can talk English, and are seasoned to the Country. The Sale to begin at Twelve o'Clock." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, July 18, 1765)

More common are advertisements such as the ones listed below. Slaveholders wishing to sell one or two slaves arranged for "publick vendue" at the Coffee House and placed newspaper ads giving the details of the sale:

"ON Saturday next will be sold at publick Vendue, at the London Coffee house, about Noon, A very strong likely Negroe Boy, about 17 Years old, has had the small pox, understands taking Care of Horses perfectly, can lay Cloth, and wait on Table for a Gentleman Family, and can do every Part of hard Labour. He will be put up at Fifty Pounds, and not under. Enquire of Mr. JUDAH FOULKE." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, May 04, 1758)

"A LIKELY NEGROE WENCH,
than can cook and wash, and has had the Small Pox, to be sold at public Vendue, at the London Coffee House, on Saturday the 20th Instant, at Twelve o'Clock." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, December 11, 1760)

"TO be sold by public Vendue,
at the London Coffee House, on Saturday the 30th Instant, a likely Negroe Wench, fit for Town or Country Business. She has had the Smallpox and Measles.
N.B. She is not sold for any Fault, but on Account of the Decease of her Master." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, January 28, 1762)

"Philadelphia, April 27, 1762.
ON the Tenth of next Month, between Twelve and One o'Clock, will be sold, at the London Coffee House, two likely Negroe Men, and a Negroe Woman; they are sold for no Fault." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, April 29, 1762)

"TO be sold by public Vendue,
at the London Coffee house,
on Saturday, the 17th Instant, at Eleven o'Clock in the Forenoon, a lusty spry Negroe Man, about 30 Years of Age, is a Tanner and Currier by Trade, but is exceeding capable of learning any other Business." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, March 15, 1764)

"TO be sold by public Vendue,
at the London Coffee house, on Saturday, the 24th of November inst. at Twelve o'Clock, A very likely healthy Negroe Girl, between 17 and 18 Years of Age, fit for Town or Country Service; she has been about five Years in the Country, has had the Smallpox, can cook, wash and iron.
N.B. The Duty already paid." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, November 22, 1764)

"TO BE SOLD, By publick vendue,
at the London Coffee House, the 15th day of April instant, A LIKELY Negroe man, about 18 or 19 years of age. Also a likely Negroe woman with a female child, who has had the small pox; can both be recommended for their honesty." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, April 02, 1767)

Not uncommonly, the spectacle of people being sold like livestock at public auction was a sale of last resort, resulting from a failure to sell the slave privately. The next few advertisements indicate that the slaves were to be sold at the London Coffee House if not sold privately prior to the announced sale date:

"TO BE SOLD,
By public Vendue, at the London Coffee house, on Saturday the 8th Day of October at 11 o'Clock, if not sold before at private Sale, A Likely healthy Negroe Wench, about 24 Years of Age, this Country born, has had the Small Pox, and Measles, understands Town and Country Business well, can Wash, Iron, Cook very well. For further Particulars enquire of JOHN MERRIT, on Society hill, in Almond street, near the Blue bell." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, September 29, 1763)

"TO be sold at the London Coffee house, at 12 o'Clock, on the 17th of March, a likely healthy Negroe Woman, about 25 Years of Age, has had the Small Pox and Measles, can Wash well, and is a good Cook; she can be well recommended for her Honesty. Any Person inclining to purchase the said Negroe before the Day of Sale, may apply to JOHN MERRIT, Caulker, in Almond street, Society hill, near the Blue Bell." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, March 8, 1764)

"TO be SOLD on Saturday next, at 12 o'Clock, at the London Coffee house, if not sold before by private Sale, a likely Negroe Woman and Child; she can cook, and do all Sorts of House Work, and is fit for either Town or Country Business. Enquire of SAMUEL SIMPSON, in Chestnut street, near the corner of Third street." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, May 09, 1765)

"A likely NEGROE MAN,
To be sold by public vendue, at the London Coffee House, on Saturday, the 19th instant May, if not sold before.
HE understands all kinds of housework, can wait on table, and tend horses; he has also some knowledge of country work. Any Person inclined to buy him at private sale, is desired to apply to the PRINTERS." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, May 10, 1770)

"TO BE SOLD,
A STRONG healthy Negroe woman, fit for country business, about 24 or 25 years of age; she is old for no fault but want of employ. For further particulars, enquire of the printers hereof. If she should not be disposed of before Saturday, the 24th of July next, she will then be sold at the London Coffee house, at 12o." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, June 28, 1770)

Even if no slave auction was scheduled, persons looking to purchase slaves could use the Coffee House "on market days" as a meeting place to arrange a sale:

"Philadelphia, August 24, 1774.
THE subscriber is now wanting a number of NEGROES, men, women, boys or girls, farmers, house Negroes, or tradesmen, that are real slaves, and good titles; all persons that have such to dispose of, please to apply to me, at the London Coffee house, on market days, from eleven o' to one, at other times at my house, the north end of Second street, opposite to the Bath. Should I be gone in the country, please to leave descriptions of the Negroes, and where to be found, with Mr. JOHN YOUNG, junior, sadler, in Market street." (The Pennsylvania Gazette, August 31, 1774)

Private Sales
Privately arranged sales, however, became the most common method of buying and selling chattel labor. Slaveholders could either inquire among friends and acquaintances whether it was known if any slaves were for sale, or they could watch the newspapers for advertisements listing slaves for sale. Slaveholders in the rural counties could not always find slaves available when they wanted them, and often resorted to contacts in Philadelphia. Such was the case with Lancaster attorney Jasper Yeates, who in 1770 wrote to Edward Burd in Philadelphia. Burd replied to Yeates' request to find a "Negro Boy" for him:
Philadelphia 5th July 1770
Dear Sir

I received your Favor of the 2d. Instant, In which you seem inclined to purchase a Negro Boy if no white Servt can be procured for you. I inquired 2 or 3 days ago at Mr. Saml. Howells who told me he had no servants of any kind at this Time to dispose of but expected a Palatine Ship in the Fall-- Uncle Jo. last Fall got a Dutch Lad who cost him £26 or £27 & was to serve him 7 Yrs.-- he learnt the English Language in a few Months, is very diligent & handy about everything.

I don't know where you could get a Negro Lad, but if you could [not readable] would it not be better to take a Dutch one, as being in general more active strong & diligent & apter to learn & better disposed to do their Business & the loss is not so great in Case of their dying or turning out ill-- however the Inconvenience of Nero [sic] Servants & the Trouble of teaching them their Duty is very great & if you could get a Negro Boy to answer your Description it would suit, I imagine very well,-- but they are rare Ones. I don't know of any Negroes to be sold, but if I knew your Determin.n I would make Inquiry. . . .

Yor. affectionate Brother
Edward Burd
(Lancaster County Historical Society, Manuscript Collection. MG-207 The Jasper Yeates/LCHS Collection, Folder 24 "Business/Family Correspondence: Edward Burd to Jasper Yeates, 1769-1773.")
 

Posted on: September 01, 2007, 12:43:50 amArranging a Sale
Hamilton's contact in Philadelphia, by 1811, was a relative of John Brown, William Brown Parker. Like Brown, Parker continued to search for slaves to purchase for Hamilton. In the following series of letters, Parker described for Hamilton how he met a Mr. Humphreys, who had an eleven year-old slave for sale:
William Brown Parker to James Hamilton, October 27, 1811 (portion)
“Philad. 27th October 1811

Sir
On my return to the City I Called at the House where the Black Boy was for Sale, his Master informed me he was then in the Country at his Fathers a few Miles from the City, but that he expected him home in the Course of a week. I Called a second time but he had not returned, when he does he will let me know, he had about 8 years to serve, his price for him is $140. I should have written you before but thought it unnecessary as the Boy was not in town.”
[letter continues on another topic]
“I am Dr. Sir Your most obt. St.
Wm B. Parker.”

William Brown Parker to James Hamilton, November 22, 1811

“Philad. 22 Novemr. 1811

Dear Sir
On my return a few days ago from Maryland and New Castle, I found your esteemed favor of the 29th of last Month at the House. My absence from home was longer than I Contemplated which must form my apology for not answering you sooner. The Negro Boy which I last wrote you about, was sold during my stay in the Country, to a person in Lancaster Co. I have been this morning with Mr. Joshua Humphreys of this City, who advertises a Black Boy for Sale, who has between 11 & 12 years to Serve, he says he is an excellent waiter, and understands taking Care of Horses and driving a Carriage--he is between 15 & 16 years of age--his price is $150. Should the above meet your approbation you can send on a Check by the return Mail. Mr. H. informed me there had been several persons speaking to him about the Boy, but he had given none of them a decisive answer, until he hears from me again--which your reply by the return post will enable me to do. Your Brother had left the City before I got to it.
I am your most Obed. & Hble St.
Wm B. Parker”

Hamilton gave his approval for the purchase, and Parker completed the sale upon receipt of Hamilton's check. In the following series of letters, Parker gives additional details about the slave, who's name is Luke, and discusses how he found transportation for Luke to Carlisle:

joanna:
Blessed Love,
thankyou for posting that, Ras Chucky.
 it was informative, as well as gut wrenching.. now i feel quite sick! :-\
i am going to have my older boys read it as they are a bit detached from slavery.. they know all about it, but haven't had the chance to see actual documents before. it might help them to realize the full implications of this vile trade in souls..quite disgusting.

thankyou again.
be blessed ,
Queen Joanna

NyaInIJahLove:
Blessings,
            It might do us well to realize that slavery is still alive and well....the trafficking of children and sexual slavery of children is estimated to be 1.2 million to 1.4 million souls annually....worldwide.
We can only get so far bemoan what has been...when the injustices continue to this very day, and what are we doing about that?????
Obviously there is a lot to do.....
Babylon is still having a field day out there....sacrificing children is Mo'loks specialty and G Bush and his cronies are Mo'lok worshippers.....how far does the corruption extend? I shudder to think.....
However Prophecy that America will fall in 2008.....time will tell...
Not to detract from the suffering that your Ancestors went thru Bred Chucky....I am just suffering from what the present generations must endure.....
Raspect
Nya

ke:
it is so sad but true sista...
blessings.
ke.

joanna:
Blessed Love,

unfortunately that is the sad state of the world today.. that's why we are trying to fix what we can, where we can.. and that's why we need your support, your letters.
yes, its boring, no its not as good as watching people attack each other on paper, but it is REALLY REALLY important to many people.
 i know Nya has been doing good works to help change this situation, or at least if it doesn't help those in need now, to educate others so at least they cant be in denial of it.
 there's no point moaning about the state of things, if you do nothing to help change it.. that's like saying "oh no i'm  drowning",while refusing to grab a branch offered to you!
and yes , we can go into the "getting involved in politics changes nothing " argument.. but do you believe the 5 year old child who is raped daily and systematically will thank you for that attitude?
it wont kill any of you.. but it COULD be the death of her if no one stands up for her.
 i dont like to be a nag, but please,please ,people.. do what you can. if for nothing else, for Sis Vee who has been here for ALL OF YOU over the last year, and is very sick.
she needs your help.

Queen Joanna

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page